Inspired By: Attraction

Welcome to the “Inspired By” series.

In these posts, I share books, music and movies that have inspired me in some form.

I format these posts with a brief discussion and include a photo gallery to give a relaxed and informal synopsis and review of how I found these works inspiring.

I will also be leaving these posts open as I know I will want to make further additions. Inspiration is typically not finite so neither should these posts be.

Disclaimer: This book was purchased by myself. My opinions are my own. I will only be reviewing books that I genuinely enjoyed so please expect this review to be positive and enthusiastic.

Attraction by RIOPY

This song is featured on the self-titled album RIOPY released in 2018.

I have no affiliation with Jean-Philippe Rio-Py nor Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company. Album images are used for reference only are the sole property of RIOPY and Warner Music Group Company.

You may find RIOPY here:

Overview

Jean-Philippe Rio-Py is a pianist and composer. His works have been featured in various movie trailers and television programs. He has released multiple albums, performed around the world and sells his sheet music on his website. And if you have ever gone looking for sheet music for your favourite songs then you will understand what a true gift this is.

I find RIOPY’s music stimulating. One piece can encourage multiple emotions and motivate reflections. It can be exciting, calming, sorrowful, and hopeful all within 3 minutes.

“Attraction” is my favourite song by RIOPY, but is not the first song I discovered. I first heard RIOPY in a fan-made YouTube video, which featured his piece titled “I Love You.” My immediate reaction was that I needed more.

“My insecurities and weaknesses find their way into my music, but also the landscapes and the people that inspire me.
I hope the music on this album can reach the soul of listeners the very same way I feel it when I play”

RIOPY

My Interpretation Of This Song

Based on the title of the piece, I believe it is intended to mimic a romantic attraction.

From a timid first greeting to building feelings for someone and experiencing the resulting journey (whether it turns into a relationship or not).

I will admit that it has brought certain people and relationships to my mind in that regard.

However, I also find myself reflecting on my anxious mind and perhaps while I listen to this track, I am attracting a better relationship with myself.

My relationship with anxiety can feel tumultuous at times. But I respect my anxious thoughts because I’ve grown to know they exist in an attempt to keep me safe.

Much like this piece, I’ve experienced slow moments of discovery, thoughts that seem to build and build in rapid progression, and have learned to slow my mind in order to create my own peace.

Why I Like This Song

Connect and Release

RIOPY’s “Attraction” allows me to connect with my feelings in order to release frustration and anxiety.

I’ve written before about how I often feel the symptoms of anxiety before I am aware that I am anxious about something. I will start to feel warm and sick and need to reflect in order to discover the triggering situation. Only once I discover my anxiety triggers am I able to self-soothe so it’s a very important process.

Listening to this piece creates a peaceful time for thoughts and feelings to bubble up. Most people may experience these moments with quiet meditation or slow and steady sounds. However, I often find my mind is too loud and darting around to ever offer a reflective moment.

The slowness at the beginning immediately catches my mind to slow down the overwhelming thoughts I’m having.

As the piece progresses, the speed builds and the notes offer multiple changes that allow my thoughts to each have their own moment. No, each thought is not given a lengthy amount of time. But it is enough to make me aware of the anxious thoughts holding firmly in the back of my mind.

As the song slows at the close, I find myself releasing frustration and anxiety from my body.

By the end, I feel lighter, happier and freer.

Use

When I’m seeking a mindful moment or just want to block out my surroundings, I will turn to this piece.

I find “Attraction” creates calm and centers me so I will often play it when I’m journaling, completing puzzles or working.

Whenever I’m writing, I find the pace of the song makes me write faster and I often don’t think about what my pen is doing–I just let whatever is inside, out.

Focusing on puzzles is my greatest stress-reliever and as this piece slows my thoughts, my mind is more centered on the puzzle.

And, finally, while working, I am less susceptible to anxiety and daydreaming while “Attraction” is playing so I am more productive and concise with my proofreading.

Needless to say, this song has become very important to me.

My personal growth journey has been impacted by RIOPY’s other pieces as well so I hope to share more of his work in the future.

Please check out RIOPY through the links provided above.

Moments of focus with knitting, puzzles and journaling. Mindful meditation and always remembering to keep looking up.

Inspired By: The Self-Care Year

I love reading and I’ve been trying to figure out how to incorporate my favourite books into my blog–and I think I’ve figured it out!

This post will be the first in the “Inspired By” series.

In these posts, I will be sharing books, music and movies that have inspired me in some form.

My initial plan is to format these posts with a brief discussion of the book and include a photo gallery to give a relaxed and informal synopsis and review of how I found these works inspiring.

I will also be leaving these posts open as I know I will want to make further additions. Inspiration is typically not finite so neither should these posts be.

Disclaimer: This book was purchased by myself. My opinions are my own. I will only be reviewing books that I genuinely enjoyed so please expect this review to be positive and enthusiastic.

The Self-Care Year by Alison Davies

Illustrations by Eleanor Hardiman

I have no affiliation with Alison Davies, Eleanor Hardiman nor the publisher Quadrille.

You may find Alison Davies here:

You may find Eleanor Hardiman here:

Overview

The Self-Care Year is a collection of seasonal suggestions for self-care activities.

The book is ordered by the four seasons and begins in Spring–a time for renewal and new beginnings.

Each season offers activities to inspire such things as creativity, balance, peace, connection, confidence and joy.

There are also activities to exercise the senses of touch and smell to provide grounding and happiness.

And, most importantly, every season encourages us to care for our mind and our body. Suggestions include breathing exercises, meditation, yoga, activities to promote better sleep habits, physical exercises, and more.

Why I Like This Book

Illustrations

Before we get to the content, what initially inspired me to pick this book up were the illustrations.

From cover to cover, this book is beautiful!

There are many pastel colours and calming images.

Every season is given a colour scheme that truly feels reflective of that time of year.

It is beautiful to read as well as beautiful to see on the shelf.

Content

Having the book organized by seasons makes it easy to use.

I often find suggestions for self-care to be overwhelming. Largely because I will want to try everything all at once. Of course, that is impossible, not only due to time constraints, but also seasonal limitations for certain activities.

It feels less overwhelming to be presented with self-care activities that we can pursue inside and outside based on the season. For example, Spring and Summer encourage us to embrace sunshine, rain and flowers. While Autumn and Winter suggest finding warmth and peace both indoors and out.

I appreciate that each season is viewed positively, and the rituals that are recommended will help us to cherish what every season has to offer.

Beyond weather, it is understood that each season brings different challenges to our overall well-being. So focus is placed on how we can improve and feel better during each season.

Use

This book may be picked up and started at any time of the year. Yes, the first section is Spring. But you can start in the same season that you first discover the book.

I started in Summer and so began reading in section 2. The world did not end.

Remember: Today can be day one. You don’t need to wait for a new month, a Monday or the strike of a new hour. Just start.

Summer: Making time outdoors to appreciate the colours of summer, visits from dragonflies, bees and birds, and the beauty of a sunset.

5 Practices To Better Support A Highly Sensitive Child

In this post, learn about how difficult childhood is when you don’t know you’re highly sensitive and are taught to suppress your highly sensitive person (HSP) identity. Then discover how to identify high sensitivity in children and practices to become a better support system.

Before I Begin…

The HSP trait is still a relatively new concept for me.

It is a personality trait I learned about for the first time roughly four months ago.

I am disclosing that this is a new term for me as a reminder that I am not an expert in this field–although I am an authority having lived as an HSP.

And not being an expert was also what kept me from sharing this post last week.

Because I am new to this particular topic, I was really suffering from imposter syndrome and felt I didn’t have a right to write about it.

But being an expert and providing academic-based articles is not the purpose of this blog.

In this blog, I share the things I am learning that allow me to reflect on my lived experiences.

And it’s very important to me to show my process of discovering, learning, reflecting and accepting new traits and insights into what makes me–me. My goal for sharing this process is that it may help and encourage others to attempt the same.

So, again, this post is being written by someone who has just recently learned they are highly sensitive, are understanding how it has impacted their past and sharing their general observations and opinions.

Disclaimer: I am not a medical doctor, psychologist, therapist or similar. This blog offers ideas, tools, strategies and recommendations based on my experience with anxiety, panic attacks and mental health. I do not guarantee any results or outcomes as strategies that have worked for me may not work for you. For diagnosis and treatment of any physical and mental health condition, consult a licensed professional.

5 Practices to Support A Highly Sensitive Child. The image shows two parents on the floor with their child, they are all smiling while resting on their elbows and have their hands joined in a stack together in front of them

Discovering The Highly Sensitive Person (HSP) Label

I first discovered the label on Instagram. Since my general interests include personality and mental health, my social media accounts recommend many fascinating pages and articles in both fields. I like it because even though not everything I discover will reflect me, it does help me to understand and be more considerate of others.

And, as I always do when I see a new term, I started researching it.

As I went down the Google rabbit hole, I was completely captivated.

Reading about the characteristics of an HSP, including their strengths and struggles, checked all the boxes for personality traits that I couldn’t categorize as being specific to my introversion or anxiety.

It also allowed me to start reconciling events from my past. Specifically, I started reflecting on the moments I was told I was too sensitive and the missteps I took while trying to deny that part of me.

What Is A Highly Sensitive Person (HSP)?

Before I continue, let’s get a general idea of an HSP.

Both introverts and extroverts may identify as HSP. This is because HSP goes beyond a specific personality trait and is believed to be rooted in biology and genetics.

Researchers believe that being highly sensitive is linked to an increased sensitivity in our central nervous system. And this increased sensitivity leaves an HSP more open to physical, emotional and social stimuli.

However, the level of sensitivity that an HSP experiences may also tie into their environment.

For example, an HSP child who is encouraged to express their sensitivity may develop differently than one who is discouraged from the same.

And let me make it clear that discouraging displays of sensitivity in a child only makes it more difficult for them to connect and communicate their thoughts and emotions constructively. It does not make them less sensitive.

General Characteristics of an HSP

HSP is a personality trait that you can identify with based on generalized characteristics.

Some of these characteristics include:

  • Emotional to the degree that people may describe you as “too sensitive.”
  • Empathic with the ability to sense others’ emotions and adopt them as your own.
  • Intuitive as having the ability to immediately sense the overall “feel” of a room.
  • Sensitive to external stimuli, whether the stimulus is sound, emotions, light, energy or something physical.
  • Quick to feel tired or overwhelmed during social situations.

There are many more characteristics, so I have provided a few links below to help you find more detailed information.

Remember that when we discuss generalizations, not all the characteristics will fit every HSP to a T. But if you can identify with the overall description, then there is a good chance that you are an HSP.

Is HSP a Mental Illness?

HSP is not a diagnosable condition and is therefore not a mental illness.

Read More | Glossary Of Terms To Support Your Mental Health Journey

Nor should it be considered a sign of poor mental health.

Yes, it comes with some struggles that, in my opinion, are primarily tied to our society discouraging strong displays of emotion.

But it is not an overtly negative trait to have.

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with these websites, but have found them useful on my journey):

Very Well Mind – What Is A Highly Sensitive Person (HSP)?

Healthline – Being a Highly Sensitive Person Is a Scientific Personality Trait

Highly Sensitive Refuge – 21 Signs You’re a Highly Sensitive Person

7 signs of a highly sensitive child. The image shows a boy sitting with his head resting on his knees and his arms wrapped around his legs while he stares at the floor.

My Experience Being An HSP In Childhood

I would prefer to share specific examples of when I encountered and struggled with specific HSP characteristics, but I feel that will require longer and deeper consideration. So instead, I am opting to be very broad while sharing my experience as a highly sensitive child.

As with anyone, much of what I experienced in my childhood impacted who I am today.

When I reflect on my elementary school days, specifically, I mainly remember instances of being told I was too sensitive or having an overall feeling of being different, broken and better off alone.

I received criticisms from other students and teachers for my inability to regulate my emotions. This is understandable since I didn’t know how to express my emotions other than through crying.  

To adapt to overstimulation, I often retreated from others and preferred quiet places alone.

I also began to teach myself to hide my feelings, or more specifically, to suppress them.

In my mind, this is the greatest mistake I have made for my overall mental health and happiness.

This is because my unchecked overthinking and overwhelm resulted in panic attacks. They were so common I had even visited the hospital and was tasked with wearing a heart monitor at one point. And though it was determined nothing was physically wrong with me, I assumed I was dying.

I wonder how different it may have been had people accepted that children might have panic attacks.

Thankfully, we know better now.

7 Signs Of A Highly Sensitive Child

I have created this list after reflecting on my experience in hopes that it may help parents and teachers to identify high sensitivity in children.

And to that end, I have endeavoured to explain how each sign may present.

However, keep in mind that this list is not comprehensive as it sticks specifically to my experience.

If you believe your child could be highly sensitive, it may be best to seek a second opinion from a professional trained in supporting highly sensitive children.

Again, HSP is not a diagnosable condition.

However, a psychologist or therapist may be able to offer advice and resources.

  • Constant crying.
    • Yes, all children cry and throw tantrums from time to time. But a highly sensitive child may be seen to cry more often than most and with very little cause.
  • Highly empathetic.
    • Tapping into their intuitive skills, they may sense the feelings of others and be seen to comfort those around them.
  • Adopting the emotions of others.
    • A highly sensitive child may be impacted by the emotions of those around them, often changing their mood accordingly. This change is done completely subconsciously and can be very overwhelming.
  • Feeling uncomfortable in clothes.
    • Again, an HSP is more sensitive to physical stimuli. Whether the discomfort is from the fabric, the fitting or an itchy clothing tag, the child may be difficult to dress or remain clothed.
  • Being very cautious and careful.
    • The highly sensitive may be less likely than other children to charge into a new environment, opting instead to observe first before acting.
  • Seeking solitude and quiet time.
    • A highly sensitive child may often opt for quiet time away from large groups and noisy environments. Solitude removes them from the overwhelming stimuli.
  • Susceptible to panic attacks.
    • Many people assume children do not have the awareness to succumb to panic attacks. But panic attacks do not require much life experience.
    • Many children can experience panic attacks due to overwhelming situations or the inability to share or release their emotions productively.
    • Symptoms of panic attacks include hyperventilation, sweating, trembling, chills, chest pain, nausea and dizziness.

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with these websites, but have found them useful on my journey):

Jenna Fleming Counseling – Traits of a Highly Sensitive Child

Today’s Parent – 9 Signs You Have A Highly Sensitive Kid

What To Expect – Highly Sensitive Child (Toddler)

Free feelings wheels for adults and children  to support highly sensitive people and improve emotional intelligence. The image includes examples of three feelings wheels that I have also provided links to further in the post.

How To Support A Highly Sensitive Child

I grew up in the 90s—when mental health and high sensitivity were not well-discussed or understood. There was a lot less information and research available. And significantly less awareness and widespread professional resources to be found.

That being said, I was supported while growing up as best as possible with the limited information available at the time.

Unfortunately, that support often presented as pushing me to be less shy and less emotional so that I would fit in better.

And this taught me to recognize a significant portion of who I am as a negative thing. Mainly, I was encouraged to suppress rather than utilize my highly sensitive skills.

I earnestly believe that had I learned how to use my skills, I may not have struggled as much with anxiety and would have a better understanding of myself and my emotions.

Thankfully, today there is a wealth of research and information available online to better understand high sensitivity and how we can support an HSP.

5 Practices to Support A Highly Sensitive Person

Using some of the research and resources I have found, I have chosen five practices that I believe would have benefited me as a child.

I have also adopted some of these strategies as an adult to support my own journey.

These practices seek to help an HSP accept themselves, understand their feelings, express their feelings and find healthy, productive ways to handle their high sensitivity.

As always, when we use the term “practice,” we must remember that these things take time, patience, effort and repetition to be effective. It is not a quick, one-and-done solution.

1. Do not encourage children to be less sensitive.

As I stated earlier, discouraging sensitivity does not make anyone less sensitive. Instead, it promotes harmful habits.

I believe much of my anxiety is tied to suppressing my highly sensitive traits.

Humans are emotional creatures, so boys and girls should be encouraged to express their emotions—regardless of whether they are highly sensitive.

2. Encourage children to share when they are struggling with overstimulation, overthinking or feeling overwhelmed.

As a child, these were very heavy feelings for me.

And I still sometimes feel a need to hold them inside, so I don’t burden anyone else.

Like the first practice I mentioned, consistently checking in with the child will encourage them to accept you as a safe person and confirm they are in a safe place for these discussions.

Checking in involves reinforcing that you want to understand by validating their emotions (good and bad) as a positive thing.

If you believe you may not be available to the degree the child may require, there are many outlets that a child can use, such as journaling, exercising, creating art or speaking with a psychologist.

Sharing heavy emotions is a practice that can benefit everyone.

Read More | 5 Steps To Create A Safe Space To Discuss Mental Health

Read More | Why You Should Start Journaling

The next three practices will make use of a feelings or emotions wheel. And I would recommend starting slowly and introducing one practice at a time. You may find free feelings wheels below–I decided to find multiple options so you may choose the wheel that is best for you and the child. If these versions do not speak to you, try searching “Feelings Wheel” or “Emotions Wheel” online. There are also paid versions available on Etsy.

I have no affiliation with these websites, but have found them useful on my journey:

Ages 1-4: iMom – The Feel Wheel

Ages 5-12: iMom – Printable Feelings Wheel for Kids and Adults

Ages teen-adult (with additional worksheets): Avan Muijen – The Emotion Wheel

Healthline – How to Use an Emotion Wheel to Get in Touch with All Your Feels

A picture that combine samples of 3 feelings or emotions wheels to provide an example of the free wheels I have provided a link to
Three examples of feelings wheels. The first two are courtesy of imom.com and the third is courtesy of avanmuijen.com. Links to download these wheels for free are provided above.

3. Teach children to name their emotions.

Being able to name an emotion is incredibly empowering.

The vocabulary of emotions is extensive to cover everything we may feel.

However, most people (adults and children alike) limit their wordlist to either feeling happy, sad, angry or fine.

So it is helpful to develop this vocabulary.

Using a feelings wheel, start in the middle and work your way out.

This practice will help a child to narrow down their big feelings.

And once a child understands what they are feeling, they can better communicate their needs.

Practice using the wheel when the child is both calm and upset so they can understand their range of emotions altogether.

4. Connect the emotion to a physical reaction.

At times, our emotions can feel like a puzzle, but our bodies can help us to decode them.

Therefore, it may help a child to learn to connect their physical reactions to their emotions.

Using the feelings wheel, ask the child to point to the wheel and their body.

For example, I know that I feel anger in my chest, sadness in my shoulders, anxiety in my back and nervousness in my legs.

You may also choose to describe to the child where you feel each emotion in your body.

A perk to demonstrating you are also doing this work is that it will help confirm to the child that they are in a safe space to share their experience.

5. Demonstrate positive expressions of emotions.

As I explained earlier, I did not know how to express my emotions as a child apart from crying. I knew since I was a baby that crying gives attention. So whether I was hurt, frustrated, excited or genuinely sad, I would always cry. I simply did not know a better way. And it did not help any caregiver to understand my needs in that moment.

So for this practice, remember that children learn by mirroring and positive reinforcement.

Practicing expressing emotions may provide a resource for the child when they experience that emotion.

To that end, point to the feelings wheel, state your current emotions and demonstrate how you express them through body language.

This practice can include allowing the child to see you cry so that they understand it is okay and genuinely good to cry sometimes.

It can also be useful to show healthy expressions of anger—which do not include shouting or directing anger at the child.

Some healthy expressions of anger are screaming into a pillow, walking away, or opening a conversation in which you explain that you are angry and why.

Use an internet search to find more ideas for expressing different emotions.

These steps will allow the child to identify what they’re feeling. And once the feeling is identified you can consider the cause and find a solution together.

Again, it is helpful to start by introducing the wheel before identifying the physical reaction and adding the element of expressing emotions last.

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with these websites, but have found them useful). This list is in no particular order:

The Gottman Institute – An Age-By-Age Guide to Helping Kids Manage Emotions

Very Well Family – 8 Discipline Strategies for Parenting a Sensitive Child

The Highly Sensitive Child – 10 Things A Highly Sensitive Child Needs To Be Happy

Raising Children – Understanding And Managing Emotions: Children And Teenagers

Beyond Blue – Managing Emotions

Parents – 4 Big Emotions To Talk About With Little Kids

The Pragmatic Parent – 7 Ways to Help Kids Identify Feelings & Control Emotions

Hi Mama – Teaching Emotions To Young Children: Tips And Tricks

Proud To Be Primary – Emotions for Kids

The Perks Of High Sensitivity

Having taken time to reflect on my past and learning strategies to use my high sensitivity effectively, I have decided that there are more positive than negative aspects to an HSP personality.

For example:

  • I have the ability to make connections with others very quickly.
  • I can be a source of sympathy for people.
  • I value emotions and can assist others in understanding theirs.
  • I also have a way with relaxing others emotions (though I’m still trying to figure out how this works).
  • And as a teacher, I can connect with my English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students beyond words.

Sensitivity and intuition kind of feel like superpowers!

I still have a lot to learn and hope to share more as I do.

The struggles of growing up as a highly sensitive person. The image includes a solo woman resting against a wall and looking off to the left

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If you are a highly sensitive person, what struggles did you face growing up? And what helped you to accept and grow your high sensitivity skills?

Let me know in the comments below!

Glossary of Terms to Support Your Mental Health Journey

Disclaimer: I am not a medical doctor, psychologist, therapist or similar. This blog offers ideas, tools, strategies and recommendations based on my experience with anxiety, panic attacks and mental health. I do not guarantee any results or outcomes as strategies that have worked for me may not work for you. For diagnosis and treatment of any physical and mental health condition, consult a licensed professional.

A mental health journey comes with a complete vocabulary of terms. And a clear understanding of these terms will assist you with the process.

Many glossaries for mental health provide definitions of disorders and conditions. So I want to focus this list on terms you will encounter during the self-work aspect of your journey.

This is not a comprehensive list. It is designed to provide a brief overview of these terms. I have also attempted to paraphrase the definitions/meanings so they may be more easily understood.

I plan to continue to add to the list over the next few months, so please feel free to offer suggestions in the comments below.

What are boundaries? Growth? Self-work?

Affirmations

Affirmations are short, positive statements we use to help retrain our brains to think positively. For affirmations to be effective, we need to say them aloud daily until we believe them to be true.

Read More| Generate Positivity with Affirmations

Boundaries

Boundaries are guidelines used to communicate what we need to feel safe, comfortable, supported and respected. Boundaries help us navigate our relationships by giving us the knowledge and ability to say yes and no to protect our well-being. There are seven types of boundaries: physical, emotional/mental, spiritual, financial, sexual, time and non-negotiables. Boundaries can change as relationships evolve.

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with this website):

Psych Central – 7 Types of Boundaries You May Need

Calm

Calm is a generally positive term meaning a state when we are not experiencing strong, negative feelings. This could mean we are free of anger, sadness, anxiety or agitation. Most coping strategies aim to “re-establish calm” or release negative thoughts and emotions.

Comfort Zone

A comfort zone is a physical or mental space in which we feel safe, secure, content and comfortable. A mental comfort zone will dissuade us from partaking in activities that may be mentally or emotionally harmful. A portion of our growth journey may involve expanding our comfort zones. This work will allow us to practice “scary” activities in small doses to redefine what our comfort zones look like.

Read More| 10 Ways to Expand Your Comfort Zone

Comforting Activities

Comforting activities are any enjoyable activity that brings us focus, calm, relaxation and comfort. Many disorders will wear on the mind and body, leaving us exhausted. Comforting activities distract our minds in order to provide much-needed relief. A comforting activity may be sleeping, watching a movie, pursuing a hobby, taking a walk, etc.

Cope/Coping

Courtesy of Oxford Languages: coping means to “deal effectively with something difficult.” The key to coping is finding an effective strategy to manage our symptoms, provide comfort and work on healing. A worthy goal of our journey may be finding coping strategies to control and heal effectively.

Read More| 7 Strategies for Coping With Morning Anxiety

Emotional Intelligence (EQ)

Emotional intelligence is a psychological theory focusing on skills to identify, understand, control and successfully express our emotions. Most studies and books on EQ focus on the workplace, but the skills are helpful for all interpersonal relationships. Within a mental health journey, practicing EQ skills can help us better understand ourselves and the roots of our negative feelings and mindsets.

Empowerment

Empowerment is all about having control and power over our mental health journey. This includes access to support networks and resources that will aid and encourage us to grow strength, confidence and authority over our lives.

Personal Empowerment

Personal empowerment is the ability to be our personal source of encouragement and support for our mental health journey. It involves taking responsibility for our journey and holding ourselves accountable to do the work, make positive choices and track our progress.

(Mental) Energy

Courtesy of Healthline: mental energy is “a mood state where you feel productive, motivated, and prepared to get things done.” Low mental energy may present as boredom, inability to focus or frequently zoning out. Feeling mentally drained may or may not cause us to also feel physically exhausted. Some mental health disorders claim a lot of our mental energy, whether we are aware of it or not.

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with this website):

Healthline – 8 Tips to Boost Mental Energy, in the Moment and in the Future

Growth

Growth refers to gaining knowledge and abilities to support and improve our mental health.  Growth can be measured by tracking goals or keeping a journal that can show how our mindset has changed. Growth can also be detected as we start recognizing when we are better capable of handling difficult situations than we had been at the beginning of our journey.

Read More| Why You Should Start Journaling

Personal Growth

Personal growth is also referred to as personal development or self-improvement. Personal growth is about developing positive behaviours, habits, mindsets, and skills to improve our mental, physical and emotional health.

Read More| 5 Personality Quizzes for Personal Growth

Healing

Unlike physical health, mental health does not have cures. Healing involves growing by learning how to cope and live with a mental health condition. A healing process begins with the desire to improve ourselves and includes seeking help, whether it be understanding our condition or pursuing therapy.

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with this website):

Psych Central – Can You Cure or Heal the Mind?

Journey

Journey is another word for the process of learning about and taking care of our mental health. We can consider it a journey as there will be a start but no definite ending. There will also be many ups and downs, comprising bright days and challenging experiences. The journey is a worthwhile endeavour to benefit our overall happiness and well-being.

Limiting Beliefs

A limiting belief is a belief or state of mind that limits or prevents us from pursuing and achieving our goals. Limiting beliefs often present themselves as fears or in I can’t/I don’t have/I’m not statements. Affirmations help identify and minimize our limiting beliefs.

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with this website):

Happier Human – 15 Limiting Beliefs Examples That Hold You Back in Life

Mental Focus

Mental focus involves making a conscious effort to concentrate on and work towards achieving our goals. Developing and improving mental focus takes time and practice. It will require us to limit distractions, create time for ourselves, take breaks for comforting activities and to practice mindfulness.

Mental Health

Mental health refers to the health of our thoughts, behaviours and emotions. We can have good mental health or poor mental health. Our mental well-being can influence our relationships, decision-making skills and how we experience the world. It can also simultaneously impact our physical health for better or worse. Poor mental health is not the same as mental illness.

Mental Health Glossary. Learn the terms you will encounter on your mental health journey.

Mental Health Awareness

Mental health awareness aims to reduce the stigma surrounding mental health and mental illness. It provides a greater understanding of mental health to reduce misconceptions and increase acceptance. Awareness and acceptance offer greater access to information, diagnoses, treatments and support.

Read More| 5 Steps to Create A Safe Space to Discuss Mental Health

Mental Health Strategies

Mental health strategies are actions used to achieve our mental health goals. These strategies may include long-term and short-term plans or practical coping activities. Practicing mental health strategies is helpful for everyone to support good mental health or treat a mental illness.

Mental Illness

Mental illness is a mental health condition that negatively disrupts or changes our thoughts, behaviours and feelings. It can make functioning in daily activities and maintaining relationships difficult. It is an umbrella term to refer to all diagnosable mental disorders. Mental illness is treatable.

Read more (I have no affiliation with these websites):

American Psychiatric Association – What is Mental Illness?

Health Direct – Types of Mental Illness

Mindfulness

Courtesy of Greater Good Magazine: “Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment, through a gentle, nurturing lens.” It is about focusing our attention on acknowledging and accepting our present thoughts and emotions without judgement. Mindfulness provides an opportunity to understand ourselves and our needs better.

Mindset

Mindset is our mental attitude that determines our ideas, beliefs, values, philosophy and worldview. Our mindset is typically established through our social and cultural settings. In some cases, our communities may lead our mindset to perceive mental health practices in a negative light.

Shifting Mindset

A mindset shift is a shift or change of our minds. It allows us to be more critical of our current beliefs and accept different philosophies to support, manage and heal our mental health. A shift in mindset is required for mental health awareness.

Read More| 5 Steps to Create A Safe Space to Discuss Mental Health

Motivation

Motivation is the driving force behind setting goals and persevering through the necessary work to achieve them. Beyond having a major end goal, motivation can be maintained by setting and achieving small goals along our journey. Being able to track improvements and using personal rewards are effective motivators.

Process

The process is a sequence of steps and stages we follow to achieve our goal of overall improved mental health. Some steps of the process will be difficult (mentally, emotionally and possibly physically). And some stages will feel frustratingly stagnant as if we are not improving or healing. Trust the process, as every bit of work we put into our journey will pay off at some point.

Safe Space

A safe space is an area (whether a physical or social environment) in which a person feels free to be themselves. This means the space is welcoming, accepting, and free from bias, criticisms and risks of physical or emotional harm. And can include acceptance of different values, sexualities, mental health, etc. 

Read More| 5 Steps to Create a Safe Space to Discuss Mental Health

Self-Care

Self-care is literally caring for the self. It is a combination of activities we follow to support our good physical, mental (or psychological), emotional and spiritual (religious or not) health. Self-care requires positive daily habits to establish a healthy environment and lifestyle. And includes activities to help us handle stressors.

Self-Discovery

Self-discovery allows us to learn about who we are, separate from the opinions and values of our family, peer groups and culture, in order to follow our own path. The process will allow us to understand our personal feelings, thoughts, needs and priorities to become who we want to be. Self-discovery can include learning about our personality, identifying our strengths and weaknesses, unlearning limiting beliefs and behaviours, and growing self-confidence.

Read More| 5 Personality Quizzes for Personal Growth

Self-Love

Courtesy of Brain & Behavior: “Self-love is a state of appreciation for oneself that grows from actions that support our physical, psychological and spiritual growth.” At its core, self-love means showing kindness to ourselves. It encourages us to prioritize our happiness and well-being rather than be lost in the needs and expectations of others. Self-love involves using positive inner thoughts, setting boundaries, treating ourselves respectfully, and nurturing our growth. It is neither selfish nor vain as prioritizing ourselves leaves us with a better capacity to support others.

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with this website):

Brain & Behavior – Self-Love and What It Means

Self-Work

Self-work is the work and effort we dedicate to improving ourselves. From setting goals to developing mental health strategies to seeking professional assistance, we must hold ourselves accountable to do the work before receiving the reward.

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with this website):

Hello Giggles – Here’s How You Can Start Your Self-Work Journey

Soothing

Soothing relieves pain or discomfort to create a feeling of calm. Different soothing methods may be used to target physical, mental, emotional or spiritual pain. Effective soothing techniques will differ from person to person, so it may be helpful to test multiple options and suggestions.

Read More| How to Self-Soothe During A Panic Attack

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with this website):

Positive Psychology – 24 Best Self-Soothing Techniques and Strategies for Adults

Stigma

Courtesy of Better Health: “stigma is when someone sees you in a negative way because of your mental illness.” Stigma involves prejudice and discrimination that is often the result of misinformation, disinformation and deception. It may prevent people from seeking help, which will, in turn, cause mental illness to worsen. Always remember that mental illness is only one aspect of our identity, and everyone has a right to strive for good mental health.

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with this website):

Better Health – Stigma, discrimination and mental illness

Therapy

Therapy or counselling is the process of meeting with a trained and licensed mental health provider in a series of sessions. Sessions may be completed privately, as a couple or in a group as needed. The term “therapy” is surrounded by stigma. However, therapy is a very healthy activity for our mental well-being and is similar to seeking physical healthcare. Therapy benefits everyone, whether seeking treatment for a mental illness or looking to improve their overall mental health.

Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy is therapy more specifically aimed at treating mental illness. A trained mental health professional may assist us in learning the cause of our condition and how to cope effectively. Psychotherapy is a clinical term we may choose to use while searching for an appropriate therapist. However, it is acceptable to refer to any form of therapy as therapy.

Glossary for Mental Health

Trauma

Courtesy of American Psychology Association: “trauma is an emotional response to a terrible event.” Physical or psychological symptoms may present immediately after the event or arise years later. Sometimes the traumatic response will be to forget specific details of the event, but our mind will still remember the danger. Psychotherapy can help unearth the details of the traumatic event to provide treatment.

Trigger

Courtesy of Healthline: “triggers are anything that might cause a person to recall a traumatic experience they’ve had.” Anything may trigger a memory of the event, including images, scents, sounds or someone discussing a similar experience. The trigger may cause minor to dangerous emotional or psychological pain. A minor reaction may be soothed with self-care and mental health strategies. However, a strong reaction may be dangerous to our safety and require help from a professional mental healthcare provider.

Read more from the pros (I have no affiliation with this website):

Healthline – What It Really Means to Be Triggered

Trigger Warning (TW)

A trigger warning is often used on social media to indicate the content may be triggering. TW will be included at the top of the post and should be followed by the topic (i.e. TW: violence). The increasing use of trigger warnings is an example of the benefits of mental health awareness.

What other words should I add? Let me know in the comments below!

5 Personality Quizzes for Personal Growth

We all have a fascination with personality quizzes.

We enjoy measuring our compatibility, discovering our spirit animal, and finding our Hogwarts house (I’m Hufflepuff, y’all!). 

Regardless of the test, receiving a general assessment of our personality is incredibly interesting.

But their value goes beyond simple fun as they are a considerable resource for personal growth.

And the internet is awash with easy quizzes created by psychologists for this exact use.

Disclaimer: I am not a medical doctor, psychologist, therapist or similar. This blog offers ideas, tools, strategies and recommendations based on my experience with anxiety, panic attacks and mental health. I do not guarantee any results or outcomes as strategies that have worked for me may not work for you. For diagnosis and treatment of any physical and mental health condition, consult a licensed professional.

5 free personality quizzes to start your self-discovery

Quizzes to Support a Personal Growth Journey

Personality tests offer a unique outsider’s perspective to help us be introspective and self-analyze.

By answering a few questions at the start of our journey, we can discover strengths and weaknesses that we might not realize we have.

Once we identify the areas we want to focus on and improve, we can set our goals.

Then we can judge our progress by retaking the tests during the journey.

5 Free Personality Quizzes

Below is a list of 5 personality quizzes that I have found most informative on my journey.

(I have no affiliation with these websites. And please note that the links will take you away from the Introvert Proofing website, and you will be subject to the Privacy Policy of those individual websites.)

All the quizzes provide a test and free, basic results. However, I will indicate anywhere additional fees may be required for in-depth results.

I have ordered the list based on the amount of free information offered on each website.

Guidelines for Completing the Quizzes

The quizzes are all multiple choice, and there are no wrong answers. To get the best results:

  1. Answer honestly and with the first answer that comes to mind.
  2. Do not overthink your responses.
  3. Do not try to answer based on what you think you should choose.

Once you have your results, think about the traits you identify with—positive and negative. Again, these are general results, so some characteristics may not apply to you. Now you can begin to focus on those traits you want to improve.

How do personality quizzes support your journey? 1. A unique outsider's perspective. 2. Discover hidden strengths and weaknesses. 3. Provide focus to set goals. 4. Track progress.

Grab yourself a beverage and get comfy; it’s time to discover who you are.

1.      16Personalities

This quiz takes roughly 10 minutes to complete.

The amount of free information on the website is rather impressive. For example, each personality type includes data for the following categories: introduction, strengths and weaknesses, romantic relationships, friendships, parenthood, career paths, workplace habits, and conclusion. Some free articles and a newsletter subscription are also available.

For more detailed information, you may pay for a premium profile. There are 3 one-time payment options that all provide an e-book specific to your personality type and access to their web content for 1 year:

  1. Basic: $29.00
  2. Basic plus access to additional tests $49.00
  3. Basic plus access to additional tests and all 16 personality e-books $169.00.

With this quiz, I learned that I am an INFJ-T, a rare personality type. It explains many of my struggles and reveals some pretty impressive strengths!

2.      Interpersonal Skills Self-Assessment

This quiz from Skills You Need takes about 15 minutes to complete.

The results are completely free. You will have the option to receive the results via email, or you may skip that option and copy/paste the results into a saveable document.

Interpersonal skills are all about how we interact with other people. And this quiz provides our percentage scores in the following categories: listening skills, emotional intelligence, verbal communication, and communicating in groups.

The results provide links to their pages with further information on developing these skills.

This quiz was important for my journey as I am very introverted. And to have the experiences I always dreamed of, I needed to identify the skills I lack.

I ranked well in emotional intelligence but need to improve in group communication. I’m working on it.

| Read more: Are Introverts Rude?

3.      Who Am I? Visual DNA

This quiz takes 10 minutes to complete.

I find this quiz format quite interesting as it provides pictures for you to react, analyze and respond to.

The results are completely free. You will receive a printable PDF showing the percentages you scored under 5 categories. And each category then explains what this means about your personality.

Note: To keep this test free, they ask that you do a brand/advertising test. It is completely optional and can be skipped to take you directly to your results. But they are well-worth the support.

The website does not provide additional information beyond the PDF. However, I like it as an interesting assessment.

This quiz encouraged me to share my journey and start my blog.

4.      Enneagram

This quiz from Truity takes 10-15 minutes to complete.

The free results are presented in a pie chart showing which personality type you most identify with.

A full 18-page report of your test results is available for $29.00.

However, the website also provides information for all 9 enneagram personalities, including their personality types, core values, relationships, and tips for growth. Read more

Enneagram is also very trendy at the moment, so you may find additional information for your number through an online search.

I’ve taken this quiz twice over a several-month period. My initial result was a 9, and my second a 1.

5.      Emotional Intelligence Test

This quiz from Psychology Today takes 45 minutes to complete.

The test offers situations and asks how you would respond in order to assess your self-awareness, social awareness, self-management, and social skills.

I am a firm believer that EQ is influential in personal growth, mental health, and relationships.

The results are provided with a rating out of 100 and one paragraph explaining if you’re doing well or not. So not a whole lot of free information.

However, a full report is available for $9.95.

I recently scored an 81 for my ability to read others’ emotions and understand myself. Unfortunately, I had taken this quiz earlier in my journey but did not document my results at that time. And I don’t want to speculate on a number. However, I do know that my score has improved!

Personality Quizzes for Personal Growth

Summary

I hope that you will find these quizzes fun and informative.

Maybe the results will surprise you, and you can better understand who you are.

As for your journey, I hope your results will help you to celebrate your strengths, identify your weaknesses and set your personal growth goals.

Have you used any personality quizzes during your journey? Please share them in the comments below!